FALSE REMEDIES FOR ARTHRITIS: PARACELSUS

During the first half of the sixteenth century there was still another immortal Roman physician. His name was Paracelsus. And he went to great lengths to make his fellow-practitioners believe that arthritis was curable.
First, Paracelsus travelled the length and breadth of Europe, asking everyone their opinion as to the cause and cure of arthritis. He questioned alchemists, the pharmacists of his day, lay healers, barber surgeons, shepherds, even gipsies—asking whether they obtained results with herbs and vegetable drugs. He also collected and studied all the knowledge of arthritis from practising physicians of many different nations. So, when Paracelsus said that arthritis was curable, he was giving the combined opinion of his day.
An Early Expert, close to the Truth
Paracelsus classified the many arthritics as victims of a tartaric disease. The word tartar originated from the Greek word for wine precipitation.
What irony! The great Paracelsus was calling arthritis a wine-like precipitate. He was very close to the correct answer . . . way back in the sixteenth century! It may well have been excessive wine-intake—practised in those days—which actually prevented oils from ever reaching their correct equilibrium and final nourishment of the joints. The wine was altering the oil composition of protein, carbohydrate, or simple oil products— robbing arthritic joints. Tartaric deposits pointed emphatically to the cause of pain. Today, in our research, we are following through where Paracelsus left off.
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FALSE REMEDIES FOR ARTHRITIS: PARACELSUSDuring the first half of the sixteenth century there was still another immortal Roman physician. His name was Paracelsus. And he went to great lengths to make his fellow-practitioners believe that arthritis was curable.First, Paracelsus travelled the length and breadth of Europe, asking everyone their opinion as to the cause and cure of arthritis. He questioned alchemists, the pharmacists of his day, lay healers, barber surgeons, shepherds, even gipsies—asking whether they obtained results with herbs and vegetable drugs. He also collected and studied all the knowledge of arthritis from practising physicians of many different nations. So, when Paracelsus said that arthritis was curable, he was giving the combined opinion of his day.An Early Expert, close to the TruthParacelsus classified the many arthritics as victims of a tartaric disease. The word tartar originated from the Greek word for wine precipitation.What irony! The great Paracelsus was calling arthritis a wine-like precipitate. He was very close to the correct answer . . . way back in the sixteenth century! It may well have been excessive wine-intake—practised in those days—which actually prevented oils from ever reaching their correct equilibrium and final nourishment of the joints. The wine was altering the oil composition of protein, carbohydrate, or simple oil products— robbing arthritic joints. Tartaric deposits pointed emphatically to the cause of pain. Today, in our research, we are following through where Paracelsus left off.*58\146\2*

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This entry was posted on Wednesday, January 12th, 2011 at 9:29 am and is filed under Arthritis. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

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